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Aimyon

Aimyon

あいみょん (Aimyon) -born on March 6, 1995 in Nishinomiya, Hyōgo Prefecture, Japan- is a Japanese singer-songwriter who debuted in 2014. Her musical activities were encouraged by grandmother who had always dreamt of being a singer and her father who worked as a sound engineer. Aimyon began songwriting since she was a second year junior high school student. His father had gifted her an electric guitar, but she couldn't connect with the instrument and abandoned it after a month. It was when she got her first acoustic guitar from an English teacher that it became her inseparable instrument. Having grown in a household where music was very present, many of her influences came from the music her parents listened to. She first started playing songs by Ozaki Yutaka and Spitz. Aimyon has stated she never thought of music in terms of genres, so her musical influences are very varied and her music isn't bounded by labels. Her influences include: Spitz, Shogo Hamada, Takuro Yoshida, Eigo Kawashima, Ozawa Kenji, Ken Hirai, Yumi Arai, BOØWY, JITTERINʼJINN, Flipper's Guitar, The Beatles, Ishizaki Huwie, and in general popular music in Japan, specially the Tokyo area. She has expressed a fascination with male singer-songwriters due to their different gender vision, although she has also expressed admiration for singers like Nakamori Akina who break with the gender stereotype. Her artist name "Aimyon" was originally a nickname given to her by a friend who was the inspiration for the song "○○chan" on the album "tamago". "Tamago" was her first mini-album, released in May 2015. the same year in december her second mini-album Nikumarekko wa Yoni ni Bakaru" was released. Her full length albums are: "Seishun no Excitement" in 2017, "Shunkanteki Sixth Sense" in 2019, "Oishii Pasta ga Aru to Kiite" in 2020 released as a double album with the potato-studio versions, "Hitomi e Ochiruyo Record" in 2022. Read more on Last.fm. User-contributed text is available under the Creative Commons By-SA License; additional terms may apply.
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